Neighbourhood Watch: West End, Glasgow

Neighbourhood Watch: West End, Glasgow

The West End: Glasgow Famous for its stunning Victorian architecture and thriving cultural scene, Glasgow’s West End, named “the hippest place in the UK” by The Times and as one of the “top ten coolest neighbourhoods in Europe” by The Independent, is a hotspot for young and mature professionals working in the city and students attending

Neighbourhood Watch: West End, Glasgow

The West End: Glasgow

Famous for its stunning Victorian architecture and thriving cultural scene, Glasgow’s West End, named “the hippest place in the UK” by The Times and as one of the “top ten coolest neighbourhoods in Europe” by The Independent, is a hotspot for young and mature professionals working in the city and students attending Glasgow University.

Greenery

Kelvingrove Park

In the heart of Glasgow’s creative scene, nature is a key attraction of the West End. Kelvingrove Park is a relaxing Victorian park featuring tennis courts, a skatepark and a restored Kelvingrove Bandstand, home to the Summer Nights mini music festival that brings open-air music back to the park.

Education

University of Glasgow

Over 26,000 students attend University of Glasgow for its prestigious education. Designed by George Gilbert Style, the Gothic revival architecture of the main building is a stunning architectural masterpiece. Described as the real-life Hogwarts, the University of Glasgow has been featured in productions including Cloud Atlas and Outlander.

Culture

Scottish Ballet Company

The West End offers a vibrant cultural scene, stimulating many professionals, families and students to live in the area and effectively has encouraged businesses to operate here. The top attractions include Kelvingrove Art Gallery, Riverside Museum and Clydeside Distillery.

The performing arts reigns supreme in the district boasting Kings Theatre showing productions including The Rocky Horror Show, the Scottish Ballet Company and the majestic Glasgow Royal Concert Hall.

Nightlife

Brel

As the bohemian district of Glasgow, the West End is home to some of the city’s most innovative spaces, cool events, creative people and prettiest streets. To complement this, the variety of unique bars are within easy reach. Brel, voted best beer garden of Glasgow in 2016 and The Parlour, home of the quirky cocktail are among the top favourites of the local community.

Cuisine

Tantrum Doughnuts

Known for its trendy cuisine, the West End offers a host of innovative eateries. From The 78, a dog-friendly vegan bar to Michelin Bib Gourmand awarded Ox and Finch. Taking fine dining to a new level of service, Six by Nico is one of Glasgow’s hotspot restaurants. Every six weeks, the restaurant changes its menu to a completely new theme, comprising of six delicious courses. Additionally, the dessert eaters will be well catered to at Tantrum Doughnuts with amazing hand-made doughnuts.

Tourism

West End Festival

Living up to its reputation as a cultural beacon of Scotland, the West End hosts several events including the annual West End Festival in June celebrating the local community and Glasgow Mela Festival, where visitors can experience Scottish music and dance in Kelvingrove Park, which always attracts lots of top performers from around the world alongside some mouth-watering food stalls too.

A Final Note

As the second largest economy in the UK, Glasgow is a thriving city set to benefit from over £16 billion of regeneration to strength the life sciences and transport industries. Proving to be a powerhouse outside of London, the West End’s bohemian reputation makes it’s a beacon for investment opportunities of residential, commercial and student properties.

Ready to see Glasgow properties? Email us at info@tarquinjones.com for more details.

 

 

info@tarquinjones.comNeighbourhood Watch: West End, Glasgow
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Ethical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT

Ethical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT

Why Invest in Ethical Property? In the world of investment, property is the safest route to net returns. After all, as long as people need accommodation, property will always be in demand be it commercial, student or residential. We’ve entered a new era of property investment, where financial return is not the only concern but

Ethical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT

Why Invest in Ethical Property?

In the world of investment, property is the safest route to net returns. After all, as long as people need accommodation, property will always be in demand be it commercial, student or residential. We’ve entered a new era of property investment, where financial return is not the only concern but also how the property can service a community.

An ageing population

Danygraig Care Home, Wales

As scientific discoveries have revolutionised medicine, the 2019 life expectancy in the UK is 80.99 years while in 1969 the life expectancy was 71.72 years. The UK celebrates over 10 million aged 65 and older, outnumbering those aged 16 and under with the baby boomer generation (1946-1964) reaching retirement age, the demand for residential and nursing homes is at high demand. Currently, 400,000 people are living in care homes, and over 800,000 people living with Dementia. By 2021, this will rise to 1 million, and be more than double by 2050.

They’re currently 400,000 people living in care homes, and due to the over 85-year-old demographic being the fastest growing age group, predicted to grow by 106% to over 2.6 million by 2030.

Bryn Illtyd Residential Home, Wales

With the mortality rate in the UK, dramatically rising, there is a dramatic increase in demand for specialist dementia and nursing care. The care home market will play a significant role in our future society, with increasing demand for quality accommodation, care and funding.

The combined market value for older people in the UK is currently estimated to be worth £22.2 billion, of which £13.4 billion is attributable to residential care. As the number of elderly people with high care needs in the UK is expected to increase over the next 20 years, the need for modern, fit for purpose care homes is increasing rapidly.

The Millennial Effect

The Bridge, Kirkcaldy

Over 62% of millennials have considered starting their own business, with 72% feeling that start-ups and entrepreneurs are a necessary economic force for creating jobs and driving innovation. According to the 2016 BNP Paribas Global Entrepreneur Report, millennials are starting businesses at younger ages than their counterparts in previous generations. Baby boomers, for example, tended to launch their first business at an average of 35 years of age. Millennials, on the other hand, start their first business around age 27, implying they’re more eager to start businesses and possibly, are more willing to take risks in doing so. The report also shows that millennials have launched about twice as many businesses as their baby boomer counterparts have

The millennial leaders demand action on major issues including climate change, mental illness and work life balance. Commercial property is seeing their influence and meeting their perquisites outdoor spaces, remote working capabilities and multipurpose spaces.

Autism and the UK

In 2019, there are approximately 700,000 autistic people in UK, more than 1 in 100. Including their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people. Many autistic children in state schools find difficulty in their needs being catered to, to the extent that 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them. Additionally, 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools.

St Camillus No7, Blackpool

As autism is a lifelong disability that cannot be seen, the need for support to cope with finding employment and surviving daily life is vital.  Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment and only 32% are in some kind of paid work.

To adhere to this, John Lewis has launched autism-friendly shoe services and The Education Authority now spends £270m a year on supporting children with special educational needs – including autism.

Final Note

With the rise of ethical factors being pushed for the forefront, the property market must represent the world we live in, both financially and medically.

 

 

 

 

 

 

info@tarquinjones.comEthical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT
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