Schools Out! Tourism’s in!

Schools Out! Tourism’s in!

Why investing in hotel property is the best thing for the summer

The arrival of August stands for one thing for many of us- a summer holiday. As Brexit approaches and the pounds value is decreasing, many holiday goers are approaching their trips with caution. Combined with the rising costs of daily life, domestic holidays, affectionately referred to as staycations are on the rise.

What does this mean for Hotels?

The increase in domestic travel over international trips means the demand for UK hotel rooms is skyrocketing. The hotel industry reached a total turnover of £98 billion in 2017 proves the demand for quality hotels in the UK is in prime demand.

tarquin jones, property investment, no.7, autism hotel,

No. 7, Blackpool

The tourism economy accounts for 9.6% of all UK jobs. This equated to 3.1 million jobs in 2013 and producing £126.9 million UK GPD in 2013. This was also a 173,000 net increase in jobs in 2010-2012.

Since 2010 tourism has been the fastest growing sector in the UK in employment terms. Britain is forecasted to have 38.8 million oversea visits equating to £24.9 billion in 2019. The tourism industry is predicted to be worth over £257 billion by 2025. The rise in tourism is a result in the millennial and Generation Z wishing to enjoy experiences over purchased items.

The Brexit Cloud

Brexit’s October deadline has seen the value of the pound plummet making international travel a financial stretch for many. As an alternative many are making the most of British soil choosing city breaks and seaside venues including Brighton, Plymouth and Cornwall. For a property investor, this is the chance of a lifetime to financially benefit from the domestic tourism demand. Investing in a hotel will see both oversea visitors take advantage of the low cost of the pound and British travellers wanting to enjoy a cost-effective vacation.

 

Interested in hotel properties? Email us at info@tarquinjones.com

 

 

info@tarquinjones.comSchools Out! Tourism’s in!
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Ethical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT

Ethical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT

Why Invest in Ethical Property?

In the world of investment, property is the safest route to net returns. After all, as long as people need accommodation, property will always be in demand be it commercial, student or residential. We’ve entered a new era of property investment, where financial return is not the only concern but also how the property can service a community.

An ageing population

Danygraig Care Home, Wales

As scientific discoveries have revolutionised medicine, the 2019 life expectancy in the UK is 80.99 years while in 1969 the life expectancy was 71.72 years. The UK celebrates over 10 million aged 65 and older, outnumbering those aged 16 and under with the baby boomer generation (1946-1964) reaching retirement age, the demand for residential and nursing homes is at high demand. Currently, 400,000 people are living in care homes, and over 800,000 people living with Dementia. By 2021, this will rise to 1 million, and be more than double by 2050.

They’re currently 400,000 people living in care homes, and due to the over 85-year-old demographic being the fastest growing age group, predicted to grow by 106% to over 2.6 million by 2030.

Bryn Illtyd Residential Home, Wales

With the mortality rate in the UK, dramatically rising, there is a dramatic increase in demand for specialist dementia and nursing care. The care home market will play a significant role in our future society, with increasing demand for quality accommodation, care and funding.

The combined market value for older people in the UK is currently estimated to be worth £22.2 billion, of which £13.4 billion is attributable to residential care. As the number of elderly people with high care needs in the UK is expected to increase over the next 20 years, the need for modern, fit for purpose care homes is increasing rapidly.

The Millennial Effect

The Bridge, Kirkcaldy

Over 62% of millennials have considered starting their own business, with 72% feeling that start-ups and entrepreneurs are a necessary economic force for creating jobs and driving innovation. According to the 2016 BNP Paribas Global Entrepreneur Report, millennials are starting businesses at younger ages than their counterparts in previous generations. Baby boomers, for example, tended to launch their first business at an average of 35 years of age. Millennials, on the other hand, start their first business around age 27, implying they’re more eager to start businesses and possibly, are more willing to take risks in doing so. The report also shows that millennials have launched about twice as many businesses as their baby boomer counterparts have

The millennial leaders demand action on major issues including climate change, mental illness and work life balance. Commercial property is seeing their influence and meeting their perquisites outdoor spaces, remote working capabilities and multipurpose spaces.

Autism and the UK

In 2019, there are approximately 700,000 autistic people in UK, more than 1 in 100. Including their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people. Many autistic children in state schools find difficulty in their needs being catered to, to the extent that 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them. Additionally, 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools.

St Camillus No7, Blackpool

As autism is a lifelong disability that cannot be seen, the need for support to cope with finding employment and surviving daily life is vital.  Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment and only 32% are in some kind of paid work.

To adhere to this, John Lewis has launched autism-friendly shoe services and The Education Authority now spends £270m a year on supporting children with special educational needs – including autism.

Final Note

With the rise of ethical factors being pushed for the forefront, the property market must represent the world we live in, both financially and medically.

 

 

 

 

 

 

info@tarquinjones.comEthical Property: THE FUTURE OF INVESTMENT
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The Rise of the Staycation

The Rise of the Staycation

Long Live the British Holiday

Ayia Napa or Robin Hood’s Bay this summer?

staycation, aiya napa, domestic tourism, summer holiday, destination holiday,

Aiya Napa

As the temperatures rise in the run-up to summer’s arrival, the annual summer holiday planning for many a Brit is taking place. The regular beach destinations including Mykonos (Greece), Lanzarote (Canary Islands), Menorca (Spain) and Algarve (Portugal) have long been favoured for their serene ambience, cultural atmosphere and performance as an escape from the grind of daily life. The beauty of Cornwall’s Talland Bay and Wales’  Llanddwyn Island, has worn away the allure of Europe, in favour of a staycation. At the same time, those of us who prefer skiing on Christmas Eve, to relaxing at home, are trading La Plagne and Livigno for Glenshee and Manchester. Data from the Great British Staycation, revealed that in 2018, 52% of 25-34-year olds took holidays within the UK for tourist attractions and financial benefits.

Robin's Hood Bay, staycation, domestic tourism, hotel property,

Robin Hood’s Bay

With the looming presence of Brexit, the magnetism of British soil is leading many holiday goers to forfeit the passport stamps in favour of domestic tourism. With the decline of the pound’s value on the global market and the impending costs of VISAs to travel within Europe, the UK has become a holiday hotspot. Tourism and marketing expert Dr Sheila Malone of Lancaster University said there had been a noticeable movement in trends following the Brexit referendum. She told Sky News: “That seemed to trigger a different kind of consumer sentiment in terms of spending – a little bit more cautious, looking for a bit more security in how they (British holidaymakers) are spending their money.”

What does this mean for the tourism industry?

Trafford Hall Hotel, Old Trafford, Manchester, Hotel Property, Domestic Tourism,

Trafford Hall Hotel, Manchester

The increase in domestic travel over overseas trips, while initially was driven by the rising costs, has become a trend, holiday goers and travellers desiring multiple short breaks throughout a year, no necessity for travel insurance, last minute holidays and reasonably priced packages. Additionally, as the pound has weakened international tourism has increased, making the UK a hotspot travel destination both nationally and across the globe. Locations such as Manchester draw consumers from all walk of life including sport and theatre.

Hotel Property

The rise in staycations stands to benefit the UK tourism industry, expected to be worth £257 billion by 2025. The hotel industry reached a total turnover of £98bn in 2017 proves the demand for quality hotels in the UK is higher than ever before.

Epic Hotel, Hotel, Liverpool, Hotel Property, Domestic Property,

Epic Hotel, Liverpool

Most popular in London & Blackpool, Hotel Property is a smart method of property investment, given the lower entry cost compared to residential property and student property. It’s an ideal method to invest in the British economy and support an industry with rapid growth. As a hands-off management investment, the hotel property is a passive income and as most investment deals offer to buy back in year 5, it’s an intelligent short-term investment.

Interested in hotel properties? Email us at info@tarquinjones.com

 

 

 

info@tarquinjones.comThe Rise of the Staycation
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